BETOOTA BITTER

For A Hard Earned Thirst That Just Wants To Stay A little Bit Longer

The Diamantina’s Greatest Export: Betoota Bitter

The Betoota Bitter logo. First designed by a resident artist from the city in 1879
The Betoota Bitter logo. First designed by a resident artist from the city in 1879

Since the first batch was brewed in 1878, Betoota Bitter has been Western Queensland’s favourite beer. Usually served cold.

Initially starting out as a hobby for our town’s first dual-income couple, The Betoota Bitter, was an overnight sensation when Jeff and Andy Carton managed to convince the publican to put on a tap at the Lord Betoota Hotel. It has been the highest-selling beer in Betoota since that day.

In a bizarre coincidence, 1878 was also the same year that our Eastern competitor in the Brisbane suburb of Milton began production.

A healthy rivalry has existed between the city brewers and the Outback brewers since then. However during the famous beer strike of 1979 – Betoota Bitter was able to maintain a competitive edge by maintaining production and taking hold of the lapsed contracts in hundreds of dry pubs throughout the bush – that and the appeal of being the only Australian beer made with pure artesian bore water.

In the early 1900s, Betoota Bitter imported a new master brewer from Shanghai to make Betoota Bitter better than possibly imaginable.

His name was Matty Sing, and it is generally accepted that it was his revolutionary idea to store Australian beers in amber glass, to protect it from the blazing Outback sun.

The first and second World Wars saw Betoota Bitter distributed across the world for our brave troops. For many a soldier, Betoota Bitter was the distinct taste of life back home. The diggers even affectionately nicknamed the lager “BB” which eventually became known as ‘Bravo Bravo’.

MODERN BREWING

After the 1950s, the Betoota Bitter brewery continued to grow after a merger with Southern beer barons, Yulli’s Brews. This included the introduction of Norman’s Australian Ale, Seabass Mediterranean Lager and the Slick Mick Red Ale.

The brewery also started using a great new innovation called the ‘can’ – a compact sized aluminium container that holds beer in it. This has allowed people to buy the beer for consumption at home.

DOES YOUR LOCAL HAVE BETOOTA BITTER ON TAP?

If you would like to enquire about getting our town’s beer to your local, please contact us at editor@betootaadvocate.com and we will pass it on to the boys in the brewery.