Fred Nile also believes in these great Australian traditions

Fred Nile also believes in these great Australian traditions

19 June, 2015. 15:06

ERROL PARKER | Editor-at-large | Contact

FRESH FROM HIS Thursday night appearance on Q&A, controversial Reverend Fred Nile has said he “emphatically believes in the great Australian traditions” while spruiking the dangers of allowing homosexuality to fester and grow in a modern Christian society.

The NSW state MP, a Christian Democrat, said a number of business owners in the US and the UK who objected to providing a service for same-sex couples had lost their livelihoods as a result of being taken to court for discrimination.

Fred Nile appeared on a special Thursday night Q&A and made a few strange comments.  PHOTO: Supplied.
Fred Nile appeared on a special Thursday night Q&A and made a few strange comments.    PHOTO: Supplied.

“This wouldn’t have happened if the Americans hadn’t abandoned their great traditions,” he said.

“The USA has a rich and vibrant history, just like Australia. It’s no coincidence that both of our once great nations began to rot once we stopped practicing life as the Bible dictates,”

“Sometimes I wonder – where would Australia be now if we all lived by His word?” he said.

The 80-year-old was promptly booed by the studio audience and faced a backlash on social media after making the controversial comments.

Australia has a string of great abandoned traditions such as our popular forced assimilation of Aboriginal people, generations of child slave labour in the agricultural industries, wholesome family-orientated segregation of public toilets and swimming pools and a genuine fear of ambition women.

Toward the end of last night’s programme, Nile was asked by an “extroverted lesbian” about his formative years, hoping that his response might give a rare insight in to the politician.

The father-of-four said he yearns for the family values he grew up with, saying that everybody was “happier back then”.

“Oh how I long for the time when everybody knew their place,” said Nile.

Immigrants are scary now because they look like ninjas. PHOTO: Supplied.
Immigrants are scary now because they look like ninjas. PHOTO: Supplied.

“We had no issues with gays because there weren’t any. We had no issues with immigrants because they were Christians and friendly. Women were happy because the men provided them with everything they needed in life,”

“Crime was low. Children were made in the missionary position and men wore ties each time they stepped outside.” he recalled.

It’s a far cry from the multi-cultural and crime riddled Australia the current generation have inherited from their parents.

Earlier this year, the Christian Democrats commissioned a report in to the state of the nation – saying they’d found some deeply disturbing trends beginning to emerge within Australian culture.

Fred Nile says that women were happier when they lived in fear of being gassed by the "Japs". PHOTO: Supplied.
Fred Nile says that women were happier when they lived in fear of being gassed by the “Japs”. PHOTO: Supplied.

In March, Nile delivered a speech inside the walls of NSW Parliament which outlined the fact that straight-shooting Liberal voting Australian men have fraternised with homosexuals for decades.

It was also news to the right-leaning political alliance that lesbians are now allowed to be politicians, as well as mothers.

“These people talk about being tolerant, homosexuals say let’s be tolerant, except when they get the power, they exercise the power. I have a number of friends now before the anti-discrimatnion tribunal who are being persecuted by homosexuals in this state.”

“They are. Don’t laugh. They are,” he added.

He then went on to accuse the gay community of using the law to persecute those who felt it was against their religious beliefs to provide services.

“What worries me in some of the states in America where it has come in, and in the UK, the people who are now being persecuted are the Christians who don’t agree with same-sex marriage,” the Reverend told the audience.

“The success of my comedy has been not being afraid to touch on subject matters or issues that everyone else is politically scared of.”

AAP